Electromyography Technologist

Electromyography (EMG) technologists use electromyography which is commonly referred to as “EMG” instruments for the purpose of measuring electrical activity in peripheral nerves which is done for the purpose of diagnosing neuromuscular disorders. According to the website www.occupationalinfo.org EMG technologists first explain the procedure to the patient. Then they apply electrode paste to the patient’s skin to make sure there is sufficient contact with electrodes that are placed where electrical activity will be measured. The EMG technologist monitors the electrical activity on an oscilloscope and records the responses either manually or via data entered into a computer. At the end of the procedure the EMG technologist removes the electrodes and cleans the electrode paste from the patient’s skin using cotton and alcohol. Physicians may order an EMG test when patients show signs of weakness andor low muscle strength so that they can determine whether the cause is related to a specific nerve that is attached to a muscle or whether there are higher order neurological or brain disorders. Aspiring EMG technologists typically earn a two-year degree or complete a hospital training program that includes courses in cardiology technology as well as an internship. The website www.payscale.com states that EMG technologists earn between approximately $14 and $20 per hour but the overtime rate of pay is between approximately $22 and $37 per hour. Annual salaries range from approximately $30000 to $44000.

Education Required: Associate's Degree
Avg Salary: $37000
High Salary: $44000
Low Salary: $30000
Tasks: Measures electrical activity in the nerves.
Explains procedures to patients.
Monitors patients during tests.
Compiles test results into a report.
Also Called: EMG Technician
EMG Instrument Operator
EMG Technologist
Muscle and Nerve Technician
Additional Resources: http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Electromyograph_(EMG)_Technician/Hourly_Rate
http://www.occupationalinfo.org/07/078362038.html
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003929.htm