Adjudicator

An adjudicator who also sometimes known as an "arbitrator" or a "judge" is provided with information and makes legally binding decisions based on the facts that are presented to them. Adjudicators are often present at competitions and they are involved in making administrative legal decisions on behalf of opposing parties. They determine winners of competitions and they grant decisions based on the facts that are given to them in out-of-court environments.

Adjudicators serve as final decision makers even though they are sometimes not attorneys or official judges. Therefore according to Education-Portal.com adjudicators are not always required to have an education higher than a bachelor's degree. Nonetheless they must have a strong knowledge of the law the legal process and they must have prior professional experience in a legal role.

Depending on specific circumstances however some adjudicators must graduate from accredited law schools. Specific educational experience is dependent on the requirements of specific jobs. There are several types of adjudicators. For example some work in the construction industry where they meet with disputing parties and attempt to come to mediated resolutions without the need for both sides to hire costly attorneys. Advance your career with a degree.

Other adjudicators work in the insurance industry where they are tasked with reviewing applications and making determinations regarding the approval and denial of claims. Adjudicators are also needed as judges of competitions where they are responsible for officiating and rating contestants. The top qualities of adjudicators are the ability to be neutral and the desire to make fair decisions. The website Payscale.com lists the salary range for an adjudicator between $36539 and $119694 per year.

Education Required: Bachelor's Degree
Avg Salary: $78116.5
High Salary: $119694
Low Salary: $36539
Tasks: Makes legally binding out-of-court decisions.
Reviews evidence.
Looks at applications, and decides whether or not to approve them.
Considers all presented material, and renders fair decisions.
Also Called: Administrative Law Judge
Judge
Mediator
Arbitrator
Additional Resources: http://www.wisegeek.com/what-does-an-adjudicator-do.htm
http://education-portal.com/articles/Become_an_Adjudicator_Education_and_Career_Roadmap.html
http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Administrative_Law_Judge%2c_Adjudicator%2c_or_Hearing_Officer/Salary