Animal Trainer

Animal trainers can teach a family pet to be obedient train a police dog to sniff out drugs or teach a dolphin to jump through rings for our entertainment. Trainers use positive reinforcement to accomplish all of these tasks.

When an animal executes the behavior the trainer intends whether its a family dog sitting on command or a marine mammal jumping out of the water the trainer gives the animal a reward and the animal eventually learns to respond to the command with the correct behavior.

Some animal trainers work in competitions or shows such as circuses where they may train elephants lions and monkeys or marine parks and aquariums where they may train sea lions dolphins and orcas. Other trainers work in animal shelters dog kennels and pet stores where they hold obedience classes for pet owners. And some trainers work with training horses on horse farms.

Animal trainers need to be patient have positive experience with animals and have a love of animals. Most animal trainers have a high school diploma although some animal training jobs such as marine mammal trainers may require a bachelor's degree and additional skills. Many dog trainers attend workshops and courses at community colleges and vocational schools to learn the skills necessary to lead obedience classes.  Get your career started with classes to become an animal trainer.

The average yearly salary for an animal trainer is around $31000 with experienced animal trainers earning over $50000 per year.

Education Required: High School Diploma & Specialized Training
Avg Salary: $34525
High Salary: $52130
Low Salary: $16920
Tasks: Evaluates animals to determine the proper training method necessary.
Conducts training programs.
Advises animal owners in matters relating to training, behavior, and obedience.
Works in animal shelters, dog kennels, and pet stores.
Also Called: Trainer
Dog Trainer
Horse Trainer
Veterinarian
Additional Resources: http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes392011.htm
http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos168.htm
http://online.onetcenter.org/link/summary/39-2011.00